Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Initial Review: adidas Terrex Boost- Trail Monster- But Can It Dance?

I spotted the adidas Terrex Boost at Outdoor Retailer as as Boost fan knew I had to learn more and try them.  The adidas Terrex Boost is in the Spring 2015 (release date) a 11.5 oz 325 gram 6mm drop mountain/trail running shoe. Women's weighs 9.9 oz 280 grams. Retail $160.  (Updated: confirmed production weight is 11.5 oz,)

I titled this review Trail Monster as on first sight this is one beefy shoe. Huge lugs,
adidas Terrex Boost
a substantial upper with overlays along the rand and toe, a shoe clearly design for rough trails, rocks, mud. The question in my mind was what would Boost, the TPU based high rebound midsole that I like so much in the adios boost racer on both roads and yes trails (review here), add to a dedicated trail shoe? I say adios Boost as close as I can tell the white Boost layer in the Terrex looks identical to the adios, at least in the forefoot and appears to sit on top of EVA that wraps up the sides. The orange Terrex and Boost logoed areas seen around the heel are a TPU based film (same material but thicker than the seamless overlays now seen so frequently on run shoes) support element. It wraps all the way around the heel. The orange TPU is not hard plastic but have some give when pressed and when running, clever.
adidas Terrex Boost

The speed laces are not my favorite way to keep a shoe snug and just right but clearly adidas has done some homework on these. Lots of friction when tightening, good. We'll see as cord wears if the friction stays. To lock, no goofy additional sliding piece as on for example the Hokas. A small black center button that as one holds the cincher is depressed. Takes considerable appropriate pressure to make it work. Cord is snug and slip free through the cincher, at least so far on new shoes.
adidas Terrex Boost
The lace tucks into a loop near the toes, no lace garage and a bit worried they might catch on branches or rocks if not wrapped around the lace loops.

The fit is roomy enough for my narrow foot with a substantial enough upper to prevent rolling of the fore and midfoot. It is quite narrow in the forefoot, especially in the area of the last quick lace loop and overlays. Strangely there is no heel counter, just soft leather like material with the heel sitting about half an inch down into the orange TPU collar. Didn't miss the heel counter except a bit on steep uphills when balancing on rocks. The TPU rear and outsole were plenty stable on downhills without the heel counter. The upper does not appear to be "water proof" or "weather resistant", and that's the way I like my uppers even in winter with the laminated rand (just above midsole) overlays protecting from shallow puddles.  With the exception of the 3 stripe midfoot bands and the overlays all the way around the outside where midsole meets upper  there are no seams or overlays whatsoever over the top of the foot all the way to the front. A very sock like fit using a rugged not overly heavy mesh, a good approach that felt great on the foot if a bit narrow upfront.

How do they run?
Apart from being heavier than I would liked my 7 mile run on a combination of rough, rocky rooty trails and smoother single track was confident, often an issue for this timid older runner on rough terrain. Yes, they ran a lot like the adios boost especially upfront, with a snappy toe spring just like the adios. They were very stable on the rough terrain, smooth and quick on the smoother gravel. Never noticed the lugs. I ran a small amount of pavement and while somewhat slappy noisy the Boost layer seemed to absorb the usual awkward presence of big lugs when running roads in such shoes. Will have to try more road miles to really confirm.

What will they be good for?
I plan to make these my winter foul weather snow running shoe. Boost has the characteristic of being less susceptible to changes in the cushioning in heat and cold so on a cold snowy day on the road the ride should be great.
Apart from winter these should make great mud running shoes and appear to be designed to be a competitor to the Salomon SpeedCross and FellRaiser among others. And I imagine they are also sensational on wet rock given the Continental rubber outsole and the big lugs. While not an ultra runner I imagine we'll see these on the feet of many Ultra folks come next year. For me they will be an everyday trail shoe, ready for just about anything along the way.
Those with wide feet or bunion problems may find the toe box too tight given the overlays.

Despite appearances Terrex Boost certainly can Dance!

Update:
See also my more recent post on 3 summer 2015 adidas Boost trail shoes:
Adizero XT Boost here
adidas Response Trail Boost here
Adistar Raven Boost  here.

See what's coming from adidas and others for trail and road in 2016 at our January 2016 Outdoor Retailer previews article here

Terrex Boost Available Now from Backcountry.com at the links below. Your purchases support RoadTrailRun.

adidas Adizero XT Boost
adidas Response Trail Boost

adidas Adistar Raven Boost













34 comments:

Nathan Jackson said...

Have you heard back about the weight? That's a pretty big discrepancy between claimed weight and the weight of the sample. I'm looking forward to this shoe, but at 11.6 in a 9 is probably pushing 14 in an 11.5, and that's far more shoe than I've had on in years. And probably more than I've ever used for running. Thanks, Nate.

sam winebaum said...

Still waiting to hear back from adidas Nate as to final weight. The only way I can see that weight could be substantially reduced to the 10.2 oz would be to reduce the lug height. I doubt that grip would be much affected beyond maybe for the deepest slickest of mud. Secondarily a lighter weight upper. At their current weight they are still mighty fine running on all surfaces but heavier than they could be with little loss of capability on 90+% of terrain.

Nathan Jackson said...

Thanks, Sam. Good to hear you are still a fan of the shoe. I don't think I'll let weight be the deal-breaker. It's just a bit odd that with so many companies trying to hit that 10 oz. mark that this would come in that heavy.

sam winebaum said...

adidas just confirmed production weight will be 11.5oz 325 grams not 10.2 as in catalog.

Nathan Jackson said...

OK. Thanks again.

Anonymous said...

Hi,
Was wondering if you had a chance to do any more road miles ? I'm looking for a shoe like this, but one that can cope with 20% or so of road on a run (whilst I get to the trails). Currently finding my Kanadia TR's a bit hardgoing on the road & was hoping the boost would cushion the ride.

sam winebaum said...

Hi, a few more road miles and not bad. The boost is sure softer than the usual trail shoe EVA.
This said one does feel the lugs. I just wish the lugs were lower profile because except for deep snow or mud they are overkill. What kind of trails do you typically run?

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the reply, love your reviews !
I'm running in very muddy farmland & bridleways at the moment. But in between fields / bridleways are often a mile of road - so I really need 2 pairs of shoes ! I've got some glide boosts which I love for road running, and some Kanadia TR's for the fields, but they are a bit harsh in between fields. I'm a massive fan of Boost, so was hoping the Terrex would cushion me more on the road.

Anonymous said...

Hi there,

I am doing the Three Peaks Challenge in the UK in May and wanted to know whether you would recommend these? I suffer from bad knees and love boost foam and think these would be good replacements for my hiking boots.

My main concern is that they are not water proof or water resistant and it is likely to be wet in May. What are your experiences now that you have had more time in them, especially in bad weather?

sam winebaum said...

I assume the 3 Peaks is liable to be wet and muddy. The traction of the Terrex Boost should be very good. I have run them in deeper snow and they do just fine there. Note while very stable they do not have a heel counter. The rear stability provided by the orange TPU layers on the midsole. You will get wet for sure. I just don't worry about wet feet as it will happen. I focus on the right socks: Ashmei from UK as I have never gotten a blister of any kind in any condition from heat, to wet, to cold and for your race maybe Drymax. Hope this helps.

sam winebaum said...

When is 3 Peaks? I would add that there is a GoreTex version of the Terrex Boost coming in the summer fall timeframe I believe. I saw it at Outdoor Retailer http://samwinebaum.blogspot.com/2015/01/outdoor-retailer-w15-day-1-photo-album.html

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the informative and quick reply - the Three Peaks is on 24th May. I did research into the Goretex Terrex Boost but it seems they will be released to the public after the challenge - I even emailed adidas for a trial pair that I'd be happy to pay for but they declined. Are they available at outdoor retailers over there?

sam winebaum said...

Sorry not available here until summer. Do most run 3 Peaks in Goretex type shoes? What size are you US or UK?

Anonymous said...

Well you would usually do the challenge in hiking boots or shoes (goretex or not) as the challenge is to complete the three highest peaks in the UK in 24 hours including driving time. People have run it but I'm not that good! The reason I wanted to go with the boost was because the last time I did it, I was left with pretty bad knees. Coupled with the fact that I have found boots pretty heavy and not the most functional had me thinking for alternatives.

I'm a size UK9. Its a shame I'm not doing it later on in the year otherwise the adidas ones look ace.

Anonymous said...

By driving time, that is because one peak is in Scotland, one is in Wales and one is in England.

Anonymous said...

hey sam, have you done any more road miles? How are they holding up? I also run trails with some road in between.

Anonymous said...

would you be able to wear these as an everyday shoe? As in going to the store, etc.

xeno said...

Will the heel counter be enough stability to handle some overpronation?

sam winebaum said...

What do you typically run trails in? Hard to say Xeno as I don't overpronate.This said the orange firm TPU side walls extend quite far forward medially (see first picture) and while it doesnt't bother me as a support shoe's firmer medial EVA or plastic might should help with pronation support I think, The lack of a traditional heel counter was not particularly noticeable to me except a bit on side hills. Hope this helps.

Anonymous said...

(I was the guy asking about cushioning on roads)

So I bought these in the end, and I've been out for a few longish runs.
I'm starting to fall in love with these shoes - for a certain set of conditions.

Pro's - Love the sock-like fit, lugs are fine on roads, cushioning is (just) enough for me - more than the Kanadias. They feel great to run in on a variety of surfaces to be honest. If you're looking for an all rounder than can cope with rough/muddy terrain, I think this is a good shoe. Its not gonna be great for banging out 20km on hard tarmac, but its not meant to. I love it for my use case - rough ground with some tarmac in between.
Laces are great.

Con's - bit 'slappy' on the roads. I'd personally like a bit more boost cushioning, but its ok. They are not as grippy as Kanadia TR's on wet ground - especially when turning/changing direction on (very) muddy ground - but given the benefits I can live with it.

For the person asking are they good for an everyday shoe - I'd say no.

With regards over-pronation - I do it slightly, and these feel great. Don't miss the heal counter.

As an approach shoe - not for me (I do a lot of walking on Dartmoor) - I'd look at the berghaus or salomon approach shoes, or the Terrex swift GTX. This is a runner's shoe.

sam winebaum said...

Glad you like them. I agree that they are for rough ground but are decent enough for stretches of road in between too. Wait till you see the Raven Boost. Review soon. All Boost and more of it than Terrex. Sadly a bit heavier with lower profile lugs so nto as slappy on the road. Very smooth ride on the road, weight aside. A very nice softer mesh upper than Terrex and real laces. As we have almost 2 meters, 5 feet of snow I have only run them on the road so far. Next week I will be in UT and will get them on dirt and review. I also have a pair of XT Zero Boost with a neat debris sleeve. These feel like they are very similar in basic construction to the Takami-Sen Boost with the addition of TPU stabilizing on the midsole side walls, like Terrex and the same outsole as the Raven. A hardcore fast trail racer I think, Will run and report on these too!

Anonymous said...

I was wondering if the toe box on this shoe is typical to the classic adidas toebox which is very narrow with little room. I love the boost but the toeboxes are just way too narrow.

sam winebaum said...

The toe box is quite narrow and made more so if you have issues with bunions etc... by the fairly stiff overlays in the area of the last lace hole. While I am sometimes bothered by narrow and overlays there and did feel those overlays I am OK in the Terrex but others with wider feet or other issues may find it too narrow there.

Anonymous said...

Sam, apologies you have been asked many question on these shoes. I am looking for a adidas shoe to run Transvulcania in May but UTMB CCC in August. I do have the XT4 and 5 and still undecided which to choose. The boost is a key factor for me. I used the Boost art shoe for a 50 mile trail race yesterday but the crib was dire.

sam winebaum said...

No problems on questions Anonymous. you say Transvulcania in May "but" CCC in August. You mean and? And you used Energy Boost ATR ? for 50 miler recently. Crib? I bet you mean not enough grip! which I totally understand for ATR. If super muddy or loose rock Terrex would be good choice if you have a narrow foot. 2 others to consider: by June you should find the XT Boost, fantastic shoe if less shoe. Good grip but not huge lugs. Boost in the front. My initial thoughts here, review soon as I did a 25K trail race last month in them. http://samwinebaum.blogspot.com/2015/03/trail-shoe-roundup-pre-review-first.html There is also a Raven Boost coming about the same time. Very comfortable, all Boost, big lugs, a bit soft but stable, a very nice long Ultra shoe. I have run some in them and it is not a fast shoe but for ultras comfort. Also you might really like the La Sportiva Mutant also in the preview above if rocky and wet. Super ankle and midfoot support, big lugs, flexible toe, not bad on the road, fairly narrow and snug but in a good way for me, decent weight for all you get.

Anonymous said...

hi, can i use the terrex boost for cross country running? i dont like spikes and like the adidas adizero boost 2 for road running...will it be good on wet grass conditions and light enough for cross country??

sam winebaum said...

I think too heavy. Much better the upcoming, this summer, XT Boost. Lighter by a lot. A bit lower lugs. See info and pics here http://samwinebaum.blogspot.com/2015/03/trail-shoe-roundup-pre-review-first.html

Anonymous said...

thanks Sam, ya i am looking for a runner mainly for cross country and the odd trail race.. for a neutral shoe. is the xt boost my best bet?? im not a fan of spikes and see alot of runners use trail runners in cross country.. are they as good as spikes, i find sore on achilles after spikes cos of low toe heel drop.. but as i said i love the adizero boost 2 for road racing...

Anonymous said...

what about adizero xt 5 again for cross country??any other good ones or is the xt boost worth waiting for??

sam winebaum said...

Not familiar with XT 5. XT Boost should be a fine choice for XC and trail races. When I ran XC many years ago we ran in light flats. The Adios Boost would also be good for dry XC courses and it is fine on moderate trails. Another to consider if you are not getting a very light dedicated non spike XC shoe might be the Nike Terra Kiger or an Inov-8 such as the X Talon 190 or 212.

Anonymous said...

Hi sam, thanks for the review, I just one question: how do they feel on concrete/road? The lugs seem huge on the pictures, do they feel uncomfortable on a hard surface? I like hiking but where I live that also means walking substentional distances on roads. Thanks, David.

sam winebaum said...

Terrex lugs are big but not too uncomfortable on the hard surfaces. This said the Raven Boost might be a better choice for harder surfaces. Lower lugs and quite a bit softer ride.

Anonymous said...

Hi Sam, thanks for the review. Any chance you could recommend a trail runner for me (women's slightly wide)? I'm new to running and have a really heavy stride (working on technique) and the lugs on my Mizuno's are killing me. I have the Adidas energy boost runners, which I really like - so something similar?

sam winebaum said...

Thanks for reading. You might like the adidas Rseponse Trail Boost. Review here http://www.roadtrailrun.com/2015/07/first-runs-review-adidas-response-trail.html while big I really don't feel the lugs in the way much even on the road. Very nicely cushioned especially the heel or a Hoka such as the Challenger ATR. review here http://www.roadtrailrun.com/2014/12/review-hoka-one-one-challenger-atr-what.html. Heavy stride? Are you over striding? Work on quicker cadence maybe