Sunday, March 12, 2017

Saucony Ride 10 Review: What a Daily Trainer Should Be! Comparisons to Ride 9

Saucony will release the Ride 10 on May 1st. The Ride 10 is a fantastic update to an already fine, lively daily trainer. The Ride 9 was my 2016 daily trainer of the year. (review here). 

Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
The 10th edition's changes make the "ride"
  • softer and more flexible 
  • a touch less snappy and responsive 
  • more smoothly cushioned and comfortable underfoot
  • with a more comfortable, well held and slightly more relaxed engineered mesh upper
Ride 10 features a new and conservatively energetic (i.e. not a bouncy soft such as Boost or Saucony's own Everun) "new" midsole material, PowerFoam. PowerFoam was previously used in other Saucony shoes such as the Triumph ISO 1, Zealot ISO 1, and Hurricane ISO 1with a grid pattern to dissipate shock just under the sock liner.
The result, likely mostly attributable to the new midsole, is a slightly heavier shoe coming in at 9.5 oz/269 grams vs. 9.2/ for the Ride 9. Catalog weights may not include the sock liner. My size 9 early sample weighs 10 oz with sock liner. The Ride 10 has a 27mm heel/19mm forefoot with an 8mm drop.


Upper and Fit
The Ride 10 features a fully engineered mesh upper with large venting holes from toe area to mid foot. The mesh is not the softest we have seen this year but given the holes is very accommodating and breathable wrapping the foot very well with mostly great pressure free support. I was sized up half a size and with anything other than the thinnest socks or very narrow feet many will want to do the same.
Also note that Saucony will, as with the Ride 9, be making the 10 available in wide for men and women as well as narrow for women in addition to normal width with sizing up to men's US 15 and women's 12.
Saucony's FlexFilm overlays are concentrated back of the lace up area with particular emphasis on the medial side, the white layer below the logo to the right below. There is a touch to much pressure for me over the biggest toe metatarsal on the medial side. 
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com 
The lateral side (lower shoe in the picture below) has more minimal FlexFilm overlay towards the metatarsals than the medial side.
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
 The more extensive white Flex Film overlays can be clearly seem below on the left side of the shoe,
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
The toe box is roomy with plenty of overhead room and should fit a wide variety of feet.  The double layer exterior laminated toe bumper is particularly well executed providing volume and avoiding a pointy front of shoe,
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
The tongue is well padded but not excessively puffy as the Ride 9's was. The heel counter is firm, fairly high and supportive and may be part of the additional weight seen as the Ride 9 had a lower heel collar.

Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
Midsole 
The Ride 10 features Saucony's injection molded Power Foam midsole material and as in the Ride 9 a top sole of Everun TPU. The Ride 9 had a compression molded SSL EVA midsole. 
Power Foam is said by Saucony to retain its cushion 50% better over a run than the prior SSL EVA and is also said to provide more consistent cushioning over the life of the shoe. Versions of Power Foam have been used in shoes such as the Triumph ISO 1, Zealot ISO 1, and Hurricane ISO 1 with a grid pattern known as PowerGrid+. Here there is no grid to absorb initial shock/conform to the foot as the Everun does this duty, and very well indeed. The PowerFoam is firmer than the SSL EVA in the Kinvara 8 and the heel toe drop is 4mm greater than in the Kinvara so there is not the sense of bottoming out without strong return we felt in the heel area of the Kinvara 8 (review here).
Power Foam is close in feel to Skechers 5GEN, Hoka's RMAT in the Hupana and Salming's new Recoil in the EnRoute (review here) all injected EVA blends with some pop. A bit less bouncy and firmer than RMAT, a bit firmer than Recoil especially in heel, it sits for me somewhere between the 5GEN in the GOrun 5 and GOmeb Razor with a firmness a touch softer than the Brooks Launch 4 but more energetic than the Launch. Bottom line this is a softer well cushioned ride with a great heel feel and for me a bit less of the firm rebound of the Ride 9. More on that and comparisons to Ride 9 below.
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
Outsole
The outsole is what has now become Saucony's standard Tri Flex design with firmer long wear XT 900 rubber at the heel then running to the front of the mid foot on the medial side for some transition support. The front rubber is Saucony's softer iBR+ blown rubber and it is softer than in the Ride 9 leading to more comfort under foot up front but a little less snap as well and this despite improved flexibility. My sense is the shoe loses some liveliness at faster tempos due to the softer rubber up front but picks up some more smooth cushion. I am told by Saucony my early sample may have softer than spec front rubber.
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
A Ride 10 GTX ($140)  Gore Tex version will be released Sept 1st. Unlike conventional GoreTex "bootie" construction with a separate exterior mesh upper  the Ride 10 GTX features an innovative new approach where the GoreTex membrane is laminated directly to the exterior mesh. This will result in a lighter, more flexible, better fitting water proof shoe. We think the look of this shoe is particularly sharp too!
Saucony Ride 10 GTX  www.roadtrailrun.com
Comparisons to Ride 9
I ran several miles the Ride 9 on one foot and the Ride 10 on the other to detect differences. 
The bottom line for me is that the Ride 10 is a smoother transitioning, softer cushioned, and a touch less responsive ride than the Ride 9, placing it closer to the Triumph ISO than the Zealot whereas Ride 9 was closer in feel to the Zealot ISO.

The midsole geometry is changed. Gone is Saucony SSL crash pad, the firm black layer on the Ride 9 below. It is replaced by a single layer of the new Power Foam and new sculpting of the sidewalls. 
The picture of the lateral side of the Ride 10 above shows uses a convex side wall shape at the heel, a shaping  shades of New Balance's Fresh Foam hexagons which deform and provide a cushion feel.  In the Ride 9 the black crash pad was firmer EVA and convex so as a result is the Ride 10 has a softer somewhat less responsive heel area than the Ride 9.
Top: Saucony Ride 9   Bottom: Saucony Ride 10
On the medial side we see the abrupt vertical sidewalls of the Ride 9 are gone, essentially a mild stability feature.  In their place is a convex shaping which should provide some very subtle stability as this shape will tend to deform less than the lateral concave side. The elimination of the vertical side walls leads to less of a sensation of pressure under the arch in the Ride 10, a noticeable improvement. 

Upper and Fit Comparisons
While the Ride 9 fit me true to size if quite snuggly the Ride 10 at a half size up is a better fit despite a more relaxed open upper mesh and fewer overlays. I like a more relaxed fit in my trainers.  While I did not notice it in my miles in the Ride 9, but absolutely did in running the 9 on one foot and the 10 on the other,  by relaxing the achilles collar in the 10 and at the same time making the heel counter a bit higher and more substantial Saucony has not only made the rear of the shoe more comfortable but also more stable and this in my half size up Ride 10 vs. true to size Ride 9. 
Left: Saucony Ride 9   Right: Saucony Ride 10
The Ride 9 had thin FlexFilm overlays back almost all the way to the 3d lace hole. The Ride 10 has white thicker ones and a logo overlay running horizontally all the way from the rear to the first lace hole with support further forward provided by the denser areas of the engineered mesh.
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
Given the use of an entirely engineered mesh in the front of the shoe including at midsole height with no overlays some support was required. Saucony wisely chose to put overlays higher up and longitudinally.
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
The result is a more accommodating fit in the Ride 10 especially low down below the horizontal overlays. While the Ride 9 was snug overall the 10 has less pressure over the at the foot bed level and a good if somewhat snug wrap higher up. When the upper combines with the new midsole geometry at mid foot there is noticeably less pressure down low at mid foot with only a slight over pressure up higher up  on the metatarsals of the big toe on the medial side.  
Left: Saucony Ride 9   Right: Saucony Ride 10 
The outsoles are very similar in design but the Ride 10 has softer forefoot rubber and is more flexible. The flex grooves on the 10 are narrower and slightly deeper. While I enjoy the extra flexibility the front of the shoe loses some pop off the road as a result of the softer forefoot rubber. After measuring and communicating with Saucony I was told that in fact my sample has slightly softer rubber than final production so I expect final versions will regain some front of the shoe pop and response. 
Left: Saucony Ride 9    Right: Saucony Ride 10
Left: Saucony Ride 10   Right: Saucony Ride 9
Ride
To date I have run 67 miles in the Ride 10. It  has just the right balance of cushion and response for a daily trainer. It has a touch of firmer rebound from the Power Foam.  A bit softer overall than the Ride 9 it is more versatile as a do it all trainer from long slow miles to up tempo miles and even marathon racing. While it loses a touch of the snappy performance feel of the Ride 9.  I am reaching for it very frequently these days. And I have dozens of different pairs to chose from. 
Saucony Ride 10  www.roadtrailrun.com
Conclusions
Saucony has done a brilliant job with this update, broadening the appeal and utility at their middle of the neutral trainer line. The Ride now better fits between the lighter, firmer Zealot ISO as a touch cushier alternative and as a firmer, faster, lighter shoe than the very plush Triumph ISO. The Power Foam midsole has a great balance of rebound, a touch of stability, and is far smoother overall and is a touch softer than the Ride 9's SSL EVA midsole. The Ride 10 is a great choice for the runner who wants one shoe for many types of workouts from long easy miles to tempo and even longer races.  To date it retains its place as my daily trainer of the year and may be in contention for higher year end honors. I am predicting the Ride 10 will be one of the most popular trainers of 2017.

Sam's Score
9.85 out of 10
-0.1 for slight pressure over the metatarsals on the medial side
-0.05 for sizing. I had to size up a half size and fit is correct there with very thin socks.

Release Date: May 1st. $130.

Comparisons
Ride 9  (review here)
The Ride 10 is somewhat softer and is smoother running. It has a a touch less of a performance responsive ride but has a better training ride. The upper is more refined and better fitting I prefer the Ride 10 and the Ride 9 was great.
Brooks Launch 4  (review here)
The Ride 10 midsole is more energetic and transitions smoother than the Launch 4. I do think the Launch 4 upper may fit me better but overall nod to the Ride 10
Nike Zoom Pegasus 33 
I am not a fan of the Pegasus 33. The ride is firm and somewhat harsh reminding me more of a light performance trainer than a daily trainer and this from a shoe weighing about the same as the Ride 10. The Pegasus has a more accommodating upper but nod to the ride of Ride.
Salming EnRoute (review here)
The Salming has a more agile quicker forefoot and transition and a softer heel. The Ride 10 is more balanced in feel and has a narrower mid foot fit but a less pointy very front of the shoe.
Hoka Hupana  (review here)
Much lighter shoe at 8.2 oz the underfoot feel of the RMAT midsole is closest to the Ride 10's Power Foam if a bit softer in the Hupana, understanding that the Hupana has no outsole at all. With nearly identical stacks the Hoka is a faster if softer shoe and very decent light training option, the Ride 10 a steadier daily trainer with plenty of outsole rubber.

Reviewer Bio
Sam is a 1:38 half marathoner on a good day. He runs approximately 40 miles per week. Sam is the Editor and Founder of Road Trail Run and has been running for 45 years and has a marathon PR of 2:28.
The Ride 10 was provided at no charge and was an early sample. Production weights and outsole rubber may change. The opinions herein are entirely the author's.

The Saucony Ride 10 is available from the stores below. 
All purchases help support Road Trail Run. Thanks!
The Ride 10 is at Running Warehouse
Available Wide and up to Size 15
Men's here 
Women's here 
Free 2 Day Shipping and Free Easy Returns

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

Will the Ride 10 be more or less forgiving than the Launch 4 towards the end of a half marathon race? Thank you.

sam winebaum said...

Hi Anonymous, They will be very similar with the Ride a bit softer, more flexible and bouncier and the Launch 4 a bit more stable and firm. Thanks for reading Road Trail Run.! You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram where we publish interesting run related content more frequently as well as links to our latest reviews, Sam, Editor

Carl said...

Hi Sam,
Thanks for a great review. How would you describe the fit of the Ride 10 compared to the Triumph ISO 3? I am leaning towards going for the Triumph for my next daily trainer. Liked the midfoot fit of the Triumph better than the Ride 9 for example, felt snugger than the ride.. //Henrik

sam winebaum said...

Hi Henrik, The Ride 10 and Triumph ISO 3 both have a great fit. I personally lean towards the more all of a piece thinner feeling wrap of the Ride over the plusher thicker fit of the Triumph ISO 3 which wraps a bit snugger under the arch. I also like the livelier ride and lighter weight of the Ride 10. If you like a real plush ride then Triumph ISO 3, if you want a bit more excitement and versatility Ride 10. http://www.roadtrailrun.com/2016/03/review-hoka-one-one-clayton-little-less.html

Carl said...

Hi Sam,

Thanks for your input. I've ordered both the Ride 9 and Triumph ISO 3 now so that I can try them on at home before making my decision. Saw that the ride 10 will release here in Sweden in June, which will be a bit too late. I'll need something more cushioned than my glide 7 for my longer runs. Think they both are more cushioned but not sure I'll need as much as there is in the Triumph, might be a bit too bulky for me. But thought they didnt feel as bulky as they were cushioned when I tried them on. Will let the fit and feeling decide. Thanks again//Henrik

Bronwen said...

Any idea how they work with orthodics? They're on my Dr's list of recommended shoes but i don't think he's updated the list in years. Thanks for this great blog!

sam winebaum said...

Hi Bronwen,
I am not sure, you would have to check. What shoes work for you now? This said as I said in the review at the foot bed level they have decent width at mid foot, better width than the Ride 9. The sock liner is fairly substantial but not as substantial as say those in an adidas Energy Boost. The engineered mesh should stretch a bit on the lateral side and up front with use. The medial side has an overlay near mid foot but not a thick one. Ride 10 will also be available in Wide. Thanks for reading Road Trail Run.! You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram where we publish interesting run related content more frequently as well as links to our latest reviews, Sam, Editor

Anonymous said...

Hi Sam,

I hope all is well. Request to know your thoughts on comparing this to the Kinvara 8? I currently wear triumph iso3 wides for all my training runs and feel it is too clunky and too much shoe (especially when I pick up the pace). I also have the Kinvara 8 for speedwork and racing. I am debating on just using the Kinvara 8 for everything...However, I was wondering where the Ride 10 fit in the mix? Thanks for your insight in advance.

sam winebaum said...

Hi Anonymous,
Thanks for asking. No question the Ride 10 will sit between the K8 and Triumph ISO 3. Far livelier and less clunky than T3 and despite extra weight I find more dynamic and fun to run than K8 which I find to soft. Of the 3 Ride 10 is the most versatile and fun to run. Very decent cushion too. It willl come in Wide as well if you need it. Sam, Editor

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the quick response Sam! With all of the above said....Is there a specific shoe you would recommend for a slightly wider foot that resembles the Kinvara, but with slightly more cushioning? I wish the hook clifton or clayton came in a wider fit....is hupana roomy at at all? Thanks in advance.

sam winebaum said...

Hi Anonymous, you might take a look at ON CloudFlow or Cloud. Hupana good too. Knit does stretch somewhat. Clayton 2 would be first choice, similar ride to K7 better cushion great roomier upper. See reviews of all at our index page here http://www.roadtrailrun.com/p/blog-page.html?m=1

Peter Macdonald said...

Great write up! Very interested in these and am at a crux moment of purchasing a new pair of running shoes for my first ever marathon towards the end of May. I've ran a couple of 1/2s (sub 1.30) in the Ride 8 which I really liked. My current Triumph ISO 2 are starting to wear a bit thin in the heel so I am looking for a replacement in the coming few weeks so as I can get some miles on them before the marathon. Triumph ISO 3, wait for the Ride 10, or the other option is the Freedom ISO. How would you compare the Freedom with the Ride 10? I'm 6'4" and 95kg. I do remember reading that when the Ride went from the 8 to the 9, that they were a tighter fit. Does that mean the 10 is even tighter still? Love the fit of both my Saucony shoes so far. Would love a shoe that felt like the Ride 8 to wear and has the plushness of the Triumph ISO 2 or 3.

sam winebaum said...

Hi Peter, you have an interesting dilemma. As your halves are sub 1:30, fine work!, stepping into another Triumph, ISO 3 would in my opinion not be the way to go if a key purpose is as a marathon shoe. The Freedom and Ride 10 are very different...rides...The Freedom, see link to reviews index below, is quite soft and bouncy and has a fairly minimal upper. I would worry that at your size it might be unstable and hard to tame in the later miles. The Ride 9 is a fine choice but you would have to make sure it wasn't to snug. It's mainly the mesh that is fairly dense and rigid in comparison to the Ride 10. I did not run in the Ride 8 but for sure the Ride 10 is a more refined and better upper, not really less snug but with room for the foot to expand especially down low. The Ride 9 is also available in a wide. 3 other good choices, Brooks Launch 4, Clayton 2 and adidas Boston 6 in that order for you. At the link our summary page with link to all the shoes mentioned above and many others. http://www.roadtrailrun.com/p/blog-page.html

Thanks for reading Road Trail Run.! You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram where we publish interesting run related content more frequently as well as links to our latest reviews, Sam, Editor

Lars said...

Hi I'm 63. I've been running for 49 years with a 1:12 13.1 & 2:36 marathon in the old days. I can manage sub 8 min pace for 8-9 miles and 30-40 mpw when I'm healthy. I've had 3x Achilles surgery and hallux rigidus surgery to fix foot. I need cushioning. I need a rocker midsole. I need a big heel-toe drop. Weight not such a big concern & I have no stability issues. The last shoe that I could depend on was the Skechers Ultra 2. I've tried the UltraR & the Hoka Clifton to no avail. A friend in the shoe biz encouraged me to look at the Ride 10 & the Triumph. Anything you can add to that recommendation or suggest beyond those two?

sam winebaum said...

Hi Lars, I am 60 have the same half PR with a 2:28 marathon both now close to 40 years ago. Same mileage these days as you but not big issues or injuries, actually only 2 run stopping injuries ever, stress fracture almost 40 years ago and some plantar's 6 or so years ago. So reading between the lines it seems a highly cushioned more flexible shoe works better than highly cushioned stiff? Do I have that right? Your friend in the biz may be right as the Triumph ISO is decently flexible for a big stack shoe. The Ride yet more flexible but closer to a performance trainer than racer. Another to look at the Salomon Pro Max. Stiffer than the Triumph but not by much. 31/24 stack. Very well cushioned but not boring on either road or trail. See my review here http://www.roadtrailrun.com/2017/04/salomon-sense-pro-max-review-versatile.html and index page with many other recent reviews. http://www.roadtrailrun.com/p/blog-page.html Thanks for reading! Sam, Editor

Lars said...

Hi Sam,

Thank you! This is a help.

My competitive background (and apparently my anatomy) is from and always was better suited to shorter middle distance stuff. Was never quite sturdy enough to hold up to the long races and/or the training to do more in them. Just got caught up in that world in the day like we all did and loved it and still do. Your accomplishments and ability to stay healthy are impressive. I'm envious! Congrats!!

Yes, I do need a flexible shoe with a lot of cushioning. My orthopedic Dr (a runner) says that I'll be healthier with a big heel to toe drop too . I'll check the Triumph ISO & the Solomon too. Have you looked at the MBT Speed 16? Haven't seen one in person but what I've read online intrigues me.

My last question. The first version of the Skechers Ultra ( & the follow up model to an extent) seemed to have something of what I refer to as a rocker midsole, from midfoot to toe, standing upright, you almost "fall" into the forefoot (which arguably, for me, may be more impt than flexibility) and it seemed to help me navigate my weakened foot architecture from the years, miles, injuries and repairs. I have been unable to find a consistent pattern of reference in shoe descriptions to this rocker type midsole. I see the term occasionally but other than ordering a shoe every time I see it, I haven't been able to find one. I saw a description of what Nike is trying in their sub 2 shoes and despite being racing shoes, they seem to be playing with this idea too. Does what I'm referring to resonate with you or in your work have you seen other models that might have a component of this rocker type midsole (and in my case, combined with cushion, some flexibility and a big drop)?

Thank you again for the time in answering me and for the good work you're doing here. Grateful!

sam winebaum said...

Hi Lars,
I have a pair of the MTB Speed and ran in them once. Yes a rocker but incredibly stiff. While not rocker type the adidas Supernova might fit the bill flexible and well cushioned. Brooks Ghost 9 as well, and similar to the Triumph in cushioning and flex. Clearly the new Nike Vapor Fly($250) or the Zoom Fly ($150) might work for you. I tried a single shoe on at Boston and there is a distinct falling forward feeling but they are stiff as a board but at least in my jogging around a hotel lobby didn't notice at all the stiffness as the combination of soft cushioning and carbon fiber plate really flows the foot along. See here coming June http://www.roadtrailrun.com/2017/04/nike-zoom-vaporfly-4-first-impressions.html Last, while departing the market Pearl Izumi had a rocker for sure. Something like the N3 or M3 might work and you might find somewhere. Reviews of many at my index page here http://www.roadtrailrun.com/p/blog-page.html Last if you are not already there join the Running Shoe Geeks on Facebook, I am an Admin. Post your story/needs along the lines of what you posted here. There are many many real experts including podiatrists, PT, run store and brand people in the group and as a rule they eagerly try to help when a runner posts specifics. Sam, Editor.

Steve Starr said...

Hi Sam, I might have mentioned on FB that I'm in the process of returning a Vomero 12 in my normal size 9D for a 9EE from Running Warehouse (regular width was pinching my forefoot.) RW is back-ordered on the Vomero in EE, however, and won't have them for a couple of weeks, and I had a chance to see the Ride 10 in person yesterday at a race and thinking of going with those instead. In the review of the Ride 10, you mentioned to go up half a size. In all Sauconys in the past I was a 9, I have a couple of pairs of the Zealot 1's in 9, I tried on the Freedom ISO and I *did* have to go to a 9.5 for a good fit (didn't buy them, too expensive.) Just want to clarify with you, that you feel it's better to go up half a size (like with the Freedom) and not my regular size 9. You thoughts are that a 9.5 would be a better bet? -Steve

sam winebaum said...

Hi Steve,
After more running in the Ride 10 i would stay at what I have, a half size up. Not sure given that if I understand you that you will be going with an a wider E how that might affect fit. The mesh up front while thin and airy is not as stretchy as some engineered mesh. Sam

Antonio Pereira said...


I am 61 years old and have used Trimph 1 and 2. But ultimanent Triumph2 get very hot when I travel more than 15ks. Weight 64 kg and height 1,70 m. I wanted to change from tennis to 1/2 marathons and marathons, would Ride 10 be a good option? Thank you.

sam winebaum said...

Hi Antonio, The Ride 10 would be a fine option. More breathable, livelier, lighter, a bit firmer. Also consider the Saucony Zealot ISO 3, coming soon. Lighter than Ride with a very accommodating roomy breathable upper. More flexible than ride. Our review here
http://www.roadtrailrun.com/2017/05/saucony-zealot-iso-3-first-run.html
Thanks for reading Road Trail Run.! You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram where we publish interesting run related content more frequently as well as links to our latest reviews, Sam, Editor

Anonymous said...

Hello Sam, I'm 1,85m and 92kg would Ride 10 be the right shoe for me. Now I'm using Asics GT-2160 and the other 2000 series.
Thanks
Michal

sam winebaum said...

Hi Michal, Thanks for writing. Given the GT series has some pronation support which I assume you may need you may want to look at the Saucony Guide 10. It is the support equivalent in the Saucony line to the Ride 10. It is certainly lighter than your ASICS 2000
Sam, Editor

Thanks for reading Road Trail Run.! You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram where we publish interesting run related content more frequently as well as links to our latest reviews. Shopping through links on articles help support RoadTrail Run and is much appreciated.

Michal said...

Thank you very much Sam for your quick response. In this case I will try Guide 10 :-)
As they are almost sold our where I live I will try to get then in the web. Do you know if Saucony Sizes are similar to the ASICS ones? In Ascics I have 48 (standard shoes 46). Thanks
Michal

sam winebaum said...

Michal, sorry I am not sure on ASICS sizing but you might check and compare the sizing description for the GT 2000 at Running Warehouse to the Guide see here http://www.runningwarehouse.eu/ASICS_GT_2000_5_Mens_Shoes_Silver_Black_Orange/descpage-A2K5M3.html?from=rtr Another shoe to consider similar to the Guide, the adidas Tempo 9. I ran them for the second time today and they are stable without being overwhelming on the pronation support. A fast shoe too.

Greg Smith said...

I bought a pair of Ride 10 in June and had to retire them in July after only 5 weeks of use and about 125 miles on them. I can usually get at least 6 months out of a shoe. Liked the cushion and fit, just disappointed in lack of longevity for a shoe that cost $120.00.