Monday, September 30, 2013

Review UltraSpire UltraViz Spry: Safety focused, Versatile, Year Round Race Vest

I am a big fan of UltraSpire run vests and packs. This relatively new company has top notch, innovative design and materials and works closely and listens to top ultra runners such as Karl Meltzer, Krissy Moehl, and Luke Nelson.  They make a very wide variety of highly functional belts and packs of very lightweight durable materials. I have purchased their Spry and Alpha vests and found them to be a perfect balance of light weight, comfort, carry capacity when needed, and zero bounce when fully loaded. I also own and have reviewed their Quantum race belt here.

I met with UltraSpire at Outdoor Retailer and they were kind enough to send me their late 2013 UltraViz SpryVest.  They also sent me their 2014 Titan 2.0 pack which I will review shortly

I was particularly taken by the UltraViz vest as it meets multiple needs:
  • winter and year round visibility and reflectivity.
  • moderate carry capacity: phone, gels, small bladder or light shell.
  • no need to have separate winter reflective vests and summer race vests. All in one.

 Key Features:

  • reflective stripes and ANSI high visibility colors  for winter month safety, and really year round if roads are on your program.
  • 2 easy to reach  deep, stretch mesh pockets on the front. I have put 6 plus gels in a pocket. My smartphone, with room to spare, fits in one pocket or you can easily put an 8 oz soft flask with no jiggling in the second pocket, or gloves, hat, etc...
  • a small zippered mesh pocket on the shoulder for electrolyte tablets or your car keys.
  • 2 shoulder elastic loops for hydration hose or an LED blinker. 
  • Single, somewhat elastic sternum strap that is easy to adjust on the go. Metal slide in hook closure as with all UltraSpire belts and closures.
  • the back has a stretch mesh pocket, with solid magnetic closure for either an optional 1.0 liter UltraSpire bladder or a light shell, gloves, etc..
  • easy to reach adjustment straps on either side to fit over bulkier clothes.

  • UltraSpire UltraViz Run Vest- rear magnetic closure pocket, fits 1 liter hydration bladder


UltraViz Spry is very similar in cut to the conventional Spry.  UltraViz Spry is made of sweat proof mesh with a smaller, less textured pattern than the Spry. Unlike the conventional Spry with its drop in pocket on one side and zipper pocket with small mesh pocket on top on the other, the UltraViz has 2 flat stretch mesh pockets. Far more versatile setup in my view. Women runner friends with the Spry comment that sternum strap should be adjustable vertically.

Road Test:
I have taken a few runs with the vest with front pockets loaded. No bounce to speak of, a tiny bit of looseness and motion in the top part of the chest but also very important the vest is in no way constricting.  Pockets are very easy to reach with no toggles or zippers to deal with. By pulling up on the top of the vest, with a bit of loosening of the side straps, one is able to reach back into the rear pocket without taking off the pack.

Pros:
Year round safety and moderate carry capacity.
Comfortable, easy to adjust with no belt pressure around the middle.
Quick, fumble free access to all pockets on the run.
Cons:
OK it is high, high visibility. Might be a bit of light show on the trail but you can't be too visible on the road.

MSRP $55.  Available from UltraSpire



Wednesday, September 25, 2013

First Review adidas adizero adios Boost: Light, Boost Powered Racer/ Light Trainer

Earlier this year adidas launched the Energy Boost featuring a midsole made of TPU instead of the conventional EVA. The Runner's World Shoe Lab found in an article by Amby Burfoot:

   "Yet after poking, prodding, stomping upon, dissecting and inspecting (under a microscope) the new     “boost” midsole, Martyn confirmed what Adidas is claiming: the shoe has “industry leading” energy return (more on this soon), thin and lightweight but effective cushioning, tremendous resistance to heat and cold, and more durability (perhaps twice as much) as conventional EVA midsoles. "

I am now on my second pair of Energy Boost and have found the claims above to be largely true. With the exception of some curling up at the toe and normal outsole wear my first pair with 300 miles feels and looks like new. The Boost material really holds up far better than conventional EVA. My review of the Energy Boost is here.

This said the Energy Boost is really a trainer. In October adidas launched the adizero adios Boost a Boost midsole version of their popular adios racer.
adios Boost

adios Boost is a light, 7.8 oz  Men's 9 US,  6.6 oz Women's 8 US  cushioned racer/trainer with heel/toe drop of 23/13mm vs. 26/17 for the Energy Boost according to Running Warehouse. This is not a low drop shoe but certainly runs like one for me. They fit me true to my size 8.5 with a light sock.

The adios Boost is just starting to be available in the US. I got mine from Wiggle in the UK earlier in September. Wiggle is a great place to get products released in Europe before the US  for very close to what they will sell for in the US and with very reasonable and rapid shipping.

Upper:
adios Boost (left) Energy Boost(right)
Unlike the Energy Boost with its stretchy soft shell "Techfit" material, the adios Boost has a conventional mesh.
The individual cells' weave is not particularly soft but as they are small and with entirely welded overlays in the toe box provide  a great combination of support and give.
The lacing goes far further towards the toe than in the Energy Boost.
The toe box is plenty wide for a racing shoe over the forefoot then somewhat pointy towards the toes. The tongue is thin mesh with minimal padding.


Midsole and Outsole:
The midsole is of course made of Boost. The construction is identical to the Energy except of course thinner at stack heights of 27.75/17.25mm vs, the Energy Boost with 31.5/21.5mm.


adios Boost Outsole
adios Boost Outsole
The outsole/midsole interface features the adidas Torsion System as on the Energy Boost, a web of thin, stiff  green plastic under the arch and extending in strips on the outer edges towards the toe. This system produces the snappy toe off and also helps stabilize the soft Boost material. It really works. In board are 2 glued on strips of small lugs: black outer sole covering tiny stiff pieces of plastic. Based on my first runs, these tinylugs help stabilize push off while giving good ground feel and providing more flexibility than solid strips of outsole would. Finally, a somewhat firmer than Boost material EVA torsion piece, ironically with the word "Boost" on it, is used in the heel for a firm yet cushioned heel landing and roll forward. The actual outsole is "Continental" rubber, as in Continental tires for claimed great slip free grip on all surfaces and long wear.





Flex:
This is one stiff shoe with a very springy flex point as illustrated in the photo (right). I was working hard to push down and flex the shoe. Some may not like this approach but I find it highly responsive at speed. The Energy Boost has a similar stiff flex but the flex point is somewhat further back than the adios. I can say that with close to 300 miles on my Energy Boost they have remained consistently stiff and I would expect the adios Boost to perform in a similar fashion. There is no break in with these shoes. The first miles will feel exactly like the last all around: cushion via Boost and flex and stability via Torsion.


Ride and Runs:
I have done 5 runs for a total of about 30 miles in the adios including a very brisk 7.5 mile tempo that included flats and steep uphills and downhills. In a word "incredible" at speed, less fun for a jog.  The adios have a great combination of snappy response and a cushioning that only be described as soft when it needs to be and firm when it needs to be. By this I mean the initial landing is soft but stable and the push off is firm, very directed with no sloppy feeling  with great ground feel and responsive rebound from the combination of Boost and Torsion. My tempo at altitude was considerably faster than expected and the next day my legs were none the worse for wear. With a marathon in 2 weeks with 2500 feet of downhill I will be cautious and run the Energy Boost but for any other race adios Boost for me!
Update: Ran my first race in the adios boost, the traditional, low key Gosport Chowder Club Huffin' for the Stuffin' 5K here in coastal NH and finished 3d overall. They felt great super snappy and firm but unlike other racing flats not harsh and jarring. Legs fresh the after the race and next day.
Update 2/2014: I have now done 3 long races in the adios Boost: 15K, Half, followed by a 20 miler the week after All three races have been surprisingly fast for me including a 1:37.42 half in cold weather, my first half under 1:40 on a legit course since 2011. Even the 20 miler yesterday was painless and I ran today with minimal soreness. The adios truly disappear on the feet, are snappy, and without removing road feel have a unique combination of race flat fast feel, great cushion and no harshness.
Update 6/16/14: 3 races in the adios in the last few weeks. A 25K trail race on wet grass, some mud and dirt/gravel roads. Great upper support and pretty decent traction. Followed that with a 5K and 10K on the road. There is something about these shoes that keeps your stride in a groove. You can feel when tired things slipping and a slight adjustment keeps one tracking straight and smooth.

Pros:
Light, cushioned, highly responsive racing machine for distances from 5K to Marathon.
Boost material really works at speed when combined with the stability of Torsion
Expected long life of midsole for consistent performance over time.

Cons:
10 mm drop may put off some but I run in mostly 4-6mm shoes and didn't notice.
Toe box may feel narrow for some but after all this is a race shoe.
Stiff forefoot with highly directed push off, not particularly "natural" for some.
Price: Expected MSRP around $140.

Other reviews: Pete Larson at Runblogger reviews the adios boost and likes them a lot.
adios boost review at Believe in the Run. adios boost directly out of the box for a marathon!

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

Outdoor Retailer Innovations- Keeping it Clean After the Run: Orange Mud Transition and Seat Wrap, Scrubba Wash Bag Reviews

With thousands of exhibitors and maybe millions of products it is sometimes hard to find the truly innovative products that are useful, simple, and unique. New exhibitors are assigned to 3 huge air conditioned tents across the street from the Salt Palace. Often they are displaying a single or a very few products. Thanks to some good pre show emails I sought out 2 really neat companies: Orange Mud and Scrubba. It turns out that both had very useful simple products for athletes used after the run, ride or workout. Orange Mud is focused on changing on the go after a workout and using the same product to keep your car seats clean. Scrubba has come up with an incredible "Washbag", the world's smallest washing machine that also doubles as a dry bag.

Scrubba Wash Bag $64.95

This crowd funded (indiegogo) Aussie company has come up with a simple way to get washing machine clean clothes on the road. More than just a washing machine the Scrubba can be used as a totally waterproof dry bag, a travel pillow, and even a foot massager.

Here is how the Scrubba Wash Bag works:

The dry bag has a plastic lamination of firm scrubbing fingers on the inside (seen below from the outside).

  • You put your clothes inside the dry bag: at least a couple pairs of shorts, t-shirts, socks, etc...
  • Add a bit of laundry soap. I use Bronner's when I travel.
  • Cover the clothes more or less with water.
    Scrubba Wash Bag- Machine is loaded!



  • Make sure the air valve is open, squeeze out the air and seal.
  • Massage the clothes against the washboard for about 3 minutes
  • Drain and fill with clean water
  • Scrubba Wash Bag- Rinse Cycle
  • Plug the air valve so air is kept inside. Shake a while and drain.


I have used it twice including all my super dusty, dirty clothes from the 16 mile trail Jupiter Peak Steeplechase last weekend and everything was immaculately cleaned.
Scrubba Wash Bag medium load- 3 pairs of socks, T-shirt, shorts



Remarkable invention. A great solution for backpacking, business travel, workout clothes left at the gym, and quick washes of your workout,  running or cycling clothes.

The Orange Mud Transition  and Seat Wrap $39.95
Brilliantly simple. The product's motto is "It's application is limitless, basically if you are dirty, and you know you often are....this will keep your car purdy! "Think of a nice large super soft beach towel with a secure hook system to wrap around your waist. Great for quick changes in parking lots after a workout. But there is more... one corner zips into a sort of hoodie. Slip the hood over your car head rest and you have a great seat cover for the drive home. And of course you can wear it as wrap around hoodie to stay warm. I have tried it and it absolutely works as advertised.

Orange Mud-wrap to change

Orange Mud-zip corner and slip over car seat
Update: Runner's World picks the Transition Wrap as one of its 2013 Gear of the Year, several months after this post.

There is more from  innovative Orange Mud. I will review separately but Orange Mud's original product is a very tiny hydration pack, the HyrdraQuiver. Instead of placing a water bottle around your waist or in a chest pocket they place it between your shoulder blades. Have run once in the pack and there is absolutely no bounce and complete freedom of arm motion. The bottle is very easy to remove and replace on the run. Brilliant, if a bit goofy looking. Also available in a 2 bottle version. Made in the USA!
Orange Mud HyrdaQuiver

Orange Mud-HyrdraQuiver


Disclosure: Products were provided at no charge for evaluation and review.

Friday, August 02, 2013

WmGault Leather IPhone 5 Sleeve and Wallet: Classy, Protective, Well Designed.

My friend Craig Miller and his wife Rita are industrious, creative, active participants in multi day Mountain Man Rendezvous where everything worn and used has to be period 1820-1840's yet they are also very tech savvy. Craig, whose business is real estate, was the first person (other than me!) I saw actively using the iPad day to day, as soon as it launched.

Craig and Rita are incredible crafts people. Rita knitting and weaving;  Craig doing fine leather work, hand forging of knives, and now pack basket weaving. Oh and they have multiple horses out on their spread East of Park City.
Wm Gault Classic Wallet and iPhone 5 Sleeve

Craig has brilliantly combined his classic, western leather working and tech savvy to launch a new company Wm Gault. The first two products, and he makes these by hand in his workshop in UT,  are a leather iPhone 5 Sleeve $65 and a super streamlined Classic Wallet, $55. They can be purchased separately or as a Duo, $110.

Outdoor Retailer Summer 13 Coverage: Trail and Road Running. Summary of my posts. Other links

I will be posting multiple articles and will be updating this page regularly over the next week or so.
So much to see at OR!

The two big trends I focused on:

  1. highly cushioned lightweight shoes
  2. GPS and smart watches going to new levels of innovation in size and interaction with the ever popular fitness apps on smart phones. (posts to come) 


Show Preview post

Hoka One One Conquest: The lightweight, super cushioned innovator launches a more responsive midsole tech.
Salomon Sense 3, Sense Ultra and new Sense Pro post: Salomon minimal trail runner line improved and with a new more affordable model the Sense Pro
New Balance Fresh Foam post: New Balance joins the low drop, cushioned category.

Keepin' it Clean Innovations post: Scrubba Wash Bag and Orange Mud Transitions and Seat Wrap.

iRunFar's 2014  best trail shoes preview: very complete

Competitor Running's short overviews of 21 new shoes: I missed some.... Clear innovation and trend towards more cushion.

Runblogger post on max cushion in a lightweight package: Altra Olympus, Hoka One One Conquest, and Brooks Transcend.

More to come...

Outdoor Retailer Summer13: New Balance Fresh Foam 980 Launch

I was tickled that New Balance invited me to the launch party for the Fresh Foam 980 road runner.
The Fresh Foam is a 8.8 oz (men 9.5), 7.3 oz (women 7) $110 retail model that will launch in February 2014. 4mm drop.
New Balance Fresh Foam 890 Men
 The Fresh Foam is New Balance's entry into the rapidly growing cushioned low drop light weight category. Quite frankly low drop and cushioned is what I like to run in for daily traiining. Shoes in this category I have run in include the Altra Torin and my new favorite the Hoka One Rapa Nui.

I was told heel forefoot stack height was 16/12 without insole so about 21/17 with insole which is  a touch on the more "minimal" side of this new category when say compared to Hokas.  I spoke to one of the design engineers and what New Balance had done is engineer the distribution of forces into the midsole and outsole via computer modeling of the structure.  They told me this is only the first step as next they will engineer the structure of the single foam internally using the same prinicples.
Note the differences in the midsole between lateral and medial sides in the pictures below.
New Balance Fresh Foam 890
New Balance Fresh Foam 890

New Balance Fresh Foam 890

New Balance Fresh Foam 890

New Balance Fresh Foam 890 Women's



Outdoor Retailer Summer13: Salomon Sense Family grows with Sense Pro

Salomon Sense Pro-Center
Update 11/13/13: Running Warehouse now has the Salomon  Sense Pro in stock. 17/22mm heel toe drop, 9.2 oz Men's 9. MSRP $130.

The Salomon Sense, the minimal light weight trail runner used by Kilian Jornet the last few years, while a fabulous shoe for this exceptional athlete is now logically extended for mere mortal serious athletes and different terrains with the Sense 3, the Sense Ultra, and the new Sense Pro.  The Sense Mantra remains in the line as a "recreational" door to trail model as does the new Salomon X-Scream models designed for all surfaces found in urban environments-dirt, pavement, gravel (right and left in picture)
Salomon Sense Pro
The key similarities between all Sense models:

  • the stretchy yet supportive Endofit with the Sensifit overlays
  • OS Tendon for heel to toe transition.
  • Salomon's QuickLace system
  • light weight: Sense 3 7.7oz, Ultra 8.6oz, Pro 9.5 oz
  • low drop, 4mm for Sense 3 and Ultra, 6mm for Pro
  • low stack heights( heel/toe in mm): Sense 14/10, Ultra 14/10, 16/10
Along with a welcome difference in price between the new Pro $130  and the Ultra $160 and Sense 3 at $200,and to my eye not quite the super fine carefully crafted materials of the Sense 3 and Ultra in the Pro and thus a bit heavier, the key differences between models are in the outsole and extent of use of ProFeel Film, a fabric like protective rock layer.
Left to Right- Salomon Sense Pro, Sense Ultra, Sense 3
The Sense Pro (left) has ProFeel Fim , the gray seen through the outsole extending all the way back through the midfoot. The outsole is similar to the Mantra's a "City to Trail" design, comfortable on the road and suitable for most trails.  A midfoot and heel striker would feel comfortable in this shoe. 
Left Salomon Sense Pro Right Salomon Sense Ultra

The Ultra has less ProFeel than the Pro and deep lugs, deeper than the model currently on the market. Ultra is now for soft ground and thus great in mud and snow.  I would use these daily for snow running.  All soft ground Salomon performance shoes will be distinguished by black and red colors.

The Sense 3 has lugs in the heel, the original had none to speak of. The ProFeel film is also extended from the original. Kilian is a pure forefoot striker and this design makes the shoe more accessible but nonetheless this is a racing machine. Salomon also expects runners to get 2X the mileage out of the Sense 3 when compared to the original versions. 

Given the low stack and drop heights all the Sense shoes should be considered fairly minimal. Probably not an every day trail trainer for most of us but great go fast shoes.  I like how Salomon has rationalized and organized the models and provided a performance Sense model at a more "reasonable" price point.  I believe the availabilities for the Sense 3 and Pro are Spring 14.

While at Salomon I also saw a new hydration belt the Agile. Made of a stretchy soft material with a wide simple velcro belt in front it features 2 deep stretch pockets with a deep center zip pocket. The 16 oz SoftFlasks will fit with far less flopping than in the fussy overly complex S-Lab Advanced Skin 2 belt.


Salomon Agile Run Belt




Monday, July 29, 2013

Outdoor Retailer Summer 2013 Preview: Run Shoes and Gear, a few of many finds to come this week.

I will be at Outdoor Retailer checking out all the new stuff. This is a preview based on pre show press releases.

Magellan Echo- Smart Phone fitness data on your wrist.
Echo Watch Magellan

The Echo watch coming fall 2013 much like the Pebble is designed to communicate with your smart phone fitness apps via Bluetooth Smart and a Wahoo (sensors) open API. I am particularly excited as it is planned to communicate with Strava. I typically start Strava and store it away in my nifty Ultraspire Quantum belt (review here) and never look until I am done. In a race I run the Nike+ watch in parallel. With the Echo I will have a run data feed to my wrist. Not sure that is such a good thing but... MSRP $149, $199 with heart rate monitor.


New Balance Fresh Foam
New Balance joins the low drop, highly cushioned runner trend with Fresh Foam based shoes. I really like my Altra Torins, adidas Energy Boost (cushioned but not low drop), and Hoka One One Rapa Nui. I will have more info after their launch event at OR
New Balance Fresh Foam
Saucony
Saucony sent me the following information about changes for Spring 2014. Mostly upgrades to PowerGrid and new uppers.

         The all new Guide 7, with its award-winning heritage, represents the longest development initiative in the brand’s history. We’ve sweated every detail and refined every element to complement the runner for the long run.  

·         The Hurricane 16 offers Guide-like stability with even more plush cushioning underfoot and the Triumph 11 features a midsole made entirely of PowerGrid™ for a supremely cushioned yet lightweight ride.

·         The Saucony Natural Motion Collection includes the Virrata 2 with a reconfigured upper and added heel support as well as the Mirage 4 with upgraded PowerGrid™ technology in the heel and a FlexFilm™ redesigned upper for a seamless fit and feel.

·         The Peregrine 4, new for the Run AnyWhere Collection, features an upgraded nylon fiber mesh rock plate for reduced weight and added flexibility.  PowerGrid™ replaces ProGrid™ in the heel for more optimal cushioning."


Scrubba


This cool Aussie company, Scrubba, sent me an email and I will be checking out their "pocket sized" washing machine. Put your clothes and a bit of water and soap inside, seal, scrub using the built in washboard on the inside of the bag. Very cool for travel and to clean a few running clothes overnight. Bag doubles as water tight storage on the trail.

Inov-8
Inov-8 will be launching a tri specific line called Tri-X-Treme. Most of their recent road runners have gotten pretty minimal and this return to a bit more cushion is welcome. The 275  seems to a close cousin of the Road-X 255 one of my favorite running shoes in recent years with yet a bit more cushion.

Sunday, July 28, 2013

Sneak Peak: 2014 Hoka One One Conquest Road Runner Updated.

I was at the SpeedGoat 50K all up and around Snowbird UT last week. A fabulous race which I spectated actively running all over the mountain in my Hoka One One Rapa Nui, review here.

Hoka was the race sponsor and legendary ultra runner Karl Meltzer is the Race Director and a long time Hoka athlete. Here he is awarding Tony Krupicka his second place beer glass and medal in his Rapa Nui. The third place finisher Jason Schlarb ran in Rapa Nui. Hokas were very popular in the field at SpeedGoat and increasingly at Ultras and on the roads. 


Hoka Conquest
Hoka One One 2014 Conquest
Hoka had a single Conquest on display at Speedgoat although I saw a few other prototypes around. I also spent time with Hoka at Outdoor Retailer. The Conquest won one of the very prized Outside magazine Gear of Show awards and there are literally thousands of exhibitors.


Hoka One One Conquest


The Conquest is an approximately 11 oz road shoe (although as with the Bondi many will run it on trails as well). In addition to a seamless upper of very fine see through mesh with an inner lining, the real story with Conquest is that the midsole is made of 2 compounds. Previous Hokas were made of a single layer of EVA. The second layer (the R-Mat) will not be traditional EVA but a compound designed to provide energy return a firmer more responsive ride, in my opinion a key improvement. While both layers are the same firmness the materials have different characteristics. While one  can go forever in Hokas, the cushy softness does seem to take a bit away from speed and responsiveness on the road and has some forefoot instability on very rough trails. These last two comments have been my only hang ups with the Rapa Nui which is a more minimal and flexible Hoka similar to the Conquest.

The following diagram from Hoka illustrates the construction. While the photos above would seem to have the foot way off the ground you actually sit far down into the foot frame.  Stack height is approximately 29mm heel and 25mm forefoot without insole, a 4 mm drop shoe so equivalent in stack heights to the Hoka Bondi and a bit higher than the more flexible Rapa Nui which is at 26/21.

The suspension frame yellow blades when combined with the top midsole allows water drainage. While hard to see in my photo above, the notches go all the way through the shoe, daylight seen through. I don't think this suspension stability frame is a gimmick.  The idea is that blades provide lateral stability, to bring the foot forward to push off. As they are not rigid they are adaptive to different stride types. One thing I have learned in talking to Hoka folks is that they take the geometry of their unusual midsoles very, very seriously basing it on a deep understanding of lateral, horizontal, and vertical forces coming from ski design.

Hoka One One 2014 Conquest

Hoka One One 2014 Conquest
I can't wait to try the Conquest!

2014 Hoka One One Bondi with new seamless upper. 

2013 Speedgoat 50K Snowbird, UT-Photos and Video

Another incredible Speedgoat on a cool day with occasional sprinkles. Sage Canaday (Scott Sports) takes the win, broke Kilian Jornet's  course "record"  taking the win by less 2 minutes over Anton Krupicka (New Balance) who closed fast in the long downhills.  Anton also broke Jornet's record. Third, Jason Schlarb (Hoka One One) wearing the incredible Rapa Nui I reviewed here. Max King (Montrail) , a World Mountain Running champion faded a bit from 3d to 4th but was in the  hunt for the podium through 22 miles.  Unfortunately I was ahead of the top women most of the way, so did not catch Stephanie Howe winning, also in a record time. Results at IRunFar.


At the first pass over Hidden Peak (top of tram) at about 8.3 miles the first two places were set. Sage was the only one of the leaders, along with Schlarb to run the top steep stretch and his uphill skills (US record holder at Mt Washington NH Road Race and a sub 2:20 marathoner) would give him the edge in the end despite a hard charge by Anton Krupicka who closed an 8 minute gap at Sugarloaf Pass down to less than 2 minutes at the finish.
Sage Canaday was one of the few leaders who ran the entire final slope to Hidden Peak- He won the $1000 prime. 2013 Speedgoat 50K 

Sage Canaday-2013 Speedgoat 50K 
Max King-2013 Speedgoat 50K 

Max King- 2013 Speedgoat 50K 



Anton Krupicka- 2013 SpeedGoat 50K





 Jason Schlarb comes over Hidden Peak in 4th place, running strong

After Hidden Peak I went over to Sugarloaf Pass, the connector between Alta and Snowbird, and caught the leaders coming out of the first part of the long climb out of Mineral Basin. After a short downhill just after where these pictures were taken they would scramble the top of Baldy at 11,000 feet. 

Sage Canaday-2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass. Coming through the meadow

Sage Canaday-2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass



Sage Canaday-2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass. Canaday was the only one of the leaders to run this very steep short stretch

Sage Canaday-2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass



Tony Krupicka-2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass

Tony Krupicka-2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass

Tony Krupicka-2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass

Tony Krupicka-2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass

Max King- 2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass

Max King- 2013 Speedgoat 50K Sugarloaf Pass
King


Canaday and his Dad. Sage kindly offered me a beer and I gave him my two cents worth on Sierre-Zinal his next race in Switzerland.

Race Director and ultra legend Karl Meltzer awards Tony Krupicka his beer glass and medal

Canaday congratulates Krupicka. Bryon Powell of iRunFar to the left providing incredible live coverage, as always.


Tired runners!

iRunFar's great race coverage and more photos here
My photos and post from 2012 Speedgoat here